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桜井香津美

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Language help [Mar. 27th, 2007|08:24 pm]
桜井香津美
Anyone who may know any Japanese:

Does "saisei no chou" sound like something an actual Japanese person would say? I mean, saisei is supposed to mean rebirth, but there's a lot of additional words that mean rebirth also.

Sankyuu. :)
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[User Picture]From: nebulosity
2007-03-28 12:55 am (UTC)
A more common term (that I've heard) for rebirth/reborn is "umare kawa(ri/ru)." But if you're trying to write a title, I guess the Japanese people would use "saisei." In addition, saisei seems to be composed of two perfectly common kanji: 再生(さいせい). I personally don't know the exact answer to your question. I would prefer the use of "(chou no) umare kawari" as I've heard it used several times, but have never heard "saisei" used.

What is chou? Is "rebirth" belonging to "chou?" If so, you need to reverse the order. :)
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[User Picture]From: shinwachou
2007-03-28 01:35 am (UTC)
I ran across "umarekawari" as well, but it translated weird in Babelfish. I know I know, Babelfish sucks, but it's not always so bad. lol

Oops, you're right. I totally meant to write it as "chou no saisei", but when I turned to LJ, I goofed. LOL

You helped so much! I'll take what you said about "umarekawari" over "saisei"... seeing as how you say it's a more common term. That's what I was looking for, the more common term. :) What's the difference between "-ri/-ru"?

*HUUUUGS* I gotta visit you sometime!!
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[User Picture]From: nebulosity
2007-03-28 01:57 am (UTC)
*huggles~!!*

Well, verbs conjugate differently depending on their type, but for kawaru, the "ru" makes it a dictionary verb, whereas "ri" makes it a noun. :)

kawaru = "to change"
kawari = "a change"

so,

umarekawaru = "to be reborn"
umarekawari = "rebirth"
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[User Picture]From: shinwachou
2007-03-28 03:09 am (UTC)
Okay, so...

If I wanted to say the equivalent of "Butterfly's rebirth", I would say "蝶の生まれ変わり"?

:) I miss learning Japanese. I need to get back into it.
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[User Picture]From: nebulosity
2007-03-28 04:48 pm (UTC)
Whoops, now I'm signed in (no anonymous). :P

Sounds great to me, although I've never seen the Kanji for chou, I'm assuming you have the correct kanji. :D I'll always be happy to answer your questions. :)
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