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桜井香津美

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Easter [Apr. 9th, 2007|02:36 am]
桜井香津美
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Easter was a good day, overall. We did our first Easter egg hunt for Olivia. :) Of course, with her being 2, we put the eggs in very conspicuous places, and had to point the eggs out to her, but it was still a blast watching her pick up the eggs. In some of them we put a few M&M's, and she'd want to open the eggs immediately, causing the candy to fall to the ground. LOL So we kept insisting she put them directly into a basket I was carrying, promising her we'd open them once we got back inside. She would bring several of the eggs to me, wanting me to open them, and I'd demand her to say "Please 闓闓 (kǎikǎi - open)", before I'd do it for her.

While we were laying down the eggs before that, though, my mom saw a baby bird in the grass. I guess it was a baby dove, I'm not sure. We thought we saw it's parents nearby, again, I'm not sure about that or where the nest was. It was alive and seemed to be OK, as much as it could be anyway, given that a wing was injured. I took it to the Humane Society down the road, knowing that with it being Easter Sunday there might not be anyone there. I knocked on the front door and no answer, so I went around to the far back, where they keep a medical clinic, and thankfully found someone. More than likely it will be sent to an emergency vet, and they had me sign a "statement of surrender", even though it's a wild animal. Hopefully the bird will be treated and sent back into the wild.
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: nebulosity
2007-04-09 06:05 pm (UTC)
It's nice to read about Olivia. :D Sounds like you guys had fun. Did you take pictures?
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From: krplt
2007-04-09 09:18 pm (UTC)

The baby bird...

Just so you know... they probably put that bird to sleep... most baby bird brought into any place will more than likely be put down... It's not like you found a bald eagle or any other type of endangered species... humane societies are so over crowded... they simple do not have time to rear a baby bird... in addition it is very difficult to do. Best thing to do when you find a baby bird is nothing at all... leave it where it's mom may come back to find it... taking it to a "humane" society is certain death... Just thought you'd like to know... in my quest to breed my parrotlets I did much reading on the culling of birds... Here are the various forms of bird euthanasia... here is what I found... some are fairly amusing...

The Following Methods Are Not Acceptable!!!!(AVMA Guidelines)

Air embolism (injecting air) - should be done only in anesthetized animals.

Blow to the head - Unacceptable for most species.

Burning - Chemical or thermal burning is not an acceptable method of euthanasia.

Chloral hydrate - Unacceptable in dogs, cats, and small mammals.

Chloroform - chloroform is extremely hazardous to personnel.

Cyanide - Cyanide poses an extreme danger to personnel

Decompression - Decompression is unacceptable for euthanasia

Drowning - Drowning is not a means of euthanasia and is inhumane.

Exsanguination (to drain of blood) - Because of the anxiety should be done only in sedated, stunned, or anesthetized animals.

Household Products and solvents - Need I say more?

Rapid freezing - Rapid freezing as a sole means of euthanasia is not humane.

Strychnine - Strychnine causes violent convulsions and painful muscle contractions.

Stunning - Stunning may render an animal unconscious, but it is not a method of euthanasia (except for neonatal animals with thin craniums). If used, it must be immediately followed by a method that ensures death.


Recommended Methods (AVMA Guidelines)

Carbon Dioxide - Carbon dioxide is recommended by most animal rights activist groups and used by human societies around the world. CO2 is inexpensive but you have to make or buy a Euthanasia Chamber and have a way to fill the chamber with the gas. Other advantages: The rapid depressant, analgesic, and anesthetic effects of CO2 are well established. Carbon dioxide is readily available and can be purchased in compressed gas cylinders. Carbon dioxide is inexpensive, nonflammable, nonexplosive, and poses minimal hazard to personnel when used with properly designed equipment. This gas causes very little distress to the birds. A CO2 concentration of 60% to 70% with a 5-minute exposure time appears to be optimal. This method is recommended provided that the gas comes from a pressurized cylinder and not a chemical reaction or internal combustion engine exhaust.

Carbon Monoxide - Same as carbon dioxide only much more dangerous for the user. This gas is colorless and odorless and builds up in your system binding to hemoglobin and replacing oxygen in your blood. You can poison yourself as well as the birds if you don't have a proper setup. Use only with the proper setup and then with extreme caution.

Inhalent Anesthetics - Highly effective providing you dose correctly. Recommendations — In order of preference, halothane, enflurane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, methoxyflurane, and desflurane, with or without nitrous oxide. I have not found any of these compounds for sale without regulations. They may be difficult to obtain and can be rather expensive.

Nitrogen or Argon - These two inert gasses are relatively safe to use (non toxic in low concentrations). Using either of these two gasses can be stressful to the birds unless the chamber is filled quickly and has less than 2% oxygen. Birds should be sedated first. Although N2 and Ar are effective, other methods of euthanasia are preferable.

Gunshot - Dangerous but effective. Should have a consistent technique.

Decapitation - Quick but messy.

Barbituates - Intravenous injection is necessary for best results and requires trained personnel.

In conclusion, the best way to euthanize is to use Carbon Dioxide and a chamber.
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